GALILEO – Is it Rubbish?

We have had some sporty gadget excitement over the last few weeks.

First with GALILEO being included on the Fenix 5 Plus Series. Second with the original Fenix 5 Series AND the Forerunner 935 also being retrofitted with GALILEO.

So What’s the big deal?

Positional accuracy should really be described in terms of GNSS. We use the term GPS which really refers to the US system of satellites that we usually use with sporty devices. GLONASS is the Russian system and GALILEO is the European one.

Sports devices and other navigational devices can use one system or a combination. GLONASS is probably of a similar level of accuracy to GPS. The advantage of using both together is that there is an increased chance of getting a good GNSS fix in areas of tricky reception. GALILEO throws yet more satellites into that mix but CRUCIALLY offers the potential of increased accuracy. We are talking accuracy of GLONASS or GPS being 5m and GALILEO being 1m. So that’s a potentially big improvement.

This will translate into us being able to have a much more accurate and pretty track in our sports software to show us where we’ve been. Hmmm. But increased accuracy MIGHT also give us usable instant pace as well as improved navigation.

Against that we might wonder if Garmin’s antennae are up to the job and we might wonder if the GALILEO system is fully operational and we might wonder if Garmin has a single- or dual-band GALILEO implementation. I’ll admit to not quite have definitive answers to any of those points. But I don’t think it really matters, all we need to know is will our sporty-gadget experience with GNSS be improved as of NOW?

Initial reports on forums are suggesting a tentative ‘YES’ in answer to that question I just posed.

I’ve heard it all before. And you probably have too. I’ve tested a lot of sports watches for their GNSS accuracy and, despite my initial excitement, I reckon that GLONASS usually decreases accuracy. I thought GLONASS always seemed to decrease accuracy but then I noticed that in some TREE-COVERED or URBAN scenario with taller buildings, that reception was sometimes improved – albeit unpredictably so. But it was still in the broad realms of ‘Not great’.

I got to the point where I do GPS-only testing. Life is too short.

My First Test

I have a long and greatly imagined series of things to do with GALILEO and running shoes. However, I stopped myself before I got too excited and decided, this evening, to embark on a sanity check run.

So I did a few repeated runs along the same route with various GNSS devices. It was a hard route as far as GNSS reception goes.

If GALILEO flunks this test then I’m probably not going to be too bothered with it going forwards.

The Test

I usually incorporate a 10-mile test route into my GNSS testing, which also includes many other real-world scenarios. 10 miles is not a trivial distance and I am in the middle of races and tapering. So I decided just to do the hard part of my 10-mile route which incorporates: good tree cover; lots of 2/3 story buildings; some LARGE buildings; a bridge (under one and over one); and an impossible GNSS tunnel.

It was about a mile long and handily ends at Sigma Sports (my local bike store) so I can drool over some extremely expensive bikes before returning to the start of the route which will allow the watch to get a good GNSS soak of whatever GPS/GALILEO/GLONASS combination was about to come.

The image on the right shows an overview of the 1-mile route and is orientated correctly North-South. Some of the images below are rotated 90 degrees clockwise as they fit the page better that way but they are segments of the EXACT same tracks shown to the right.

Here’s what I did with the Garmin, Suunto and Polar. It’s no coincidence that I chose the V800 and SPARTAN SPORT, they are 2 of the best GPS devices (the 935 isn’t but I still use it anyway #STRYD)

Run 1

Run 2

  • Garmin 935 – GPS+GLONASS, right arm. Normal wrist position.
  • Suunto Spartan Sport – GPS, left arm

Run 3

  • Garmin 935 – GPS, right arm. Normal wrist position.
  • Suunto Spartan Sport – GPS, left arm

I ran the exact same route to the nearest 50cm left or right and the sky was clear.

Legend/Key

 

Image 1 – The 3x Suunto Runs

I’m showing this first image of the 3x Suunto Runs (1 watch, 3 runs) as it demonstrates the variation that one device can have on the same route on the same day.

Clickable, Blue Suunto, Pink Suunto, Orange Suunto (colours change across images)

So there are some quite large variations. Maybe the blue track is the best. From the VERY many runs I’ve done on this section, I would say that the 3 Suunto SPARTAN tracks shown above are DEFINITELY WELL on the GOOD side of average. But you can see as well as me that in the middle under the words ‘River Thames’ there is probably a 10m gap between the blue and orange lines. Clear improvement is possible in some situations.

Image 2 – Zoom-In and Add V800

This adds in the V800 to the 3x Suuntos. The V800 is similarly good, possibly better.

Clickable, Blue Suunto, Pink Suunto, Orange Suunto, Green V800

 

Image 3 / 4 – Galileo

Let’s leave the other devices for a minute and concentrate on the 3x Garmin runs.

These are the 3 Garmin runs. Which one is Galileo?

Pink 935 Glonass, Red 935 Galileo, Yellow 935 GPS

Well. The pink one is GLONASS. That clearly went wrong and that is exactly the sort of thing I have experienced many times with GLONASS, sometimes much worse than that.

The red one is the Galileo track and it’s probably the better of the 3 over this entire section but not so great on the top right.

Here are the same 3 Garmin tracks on the other part of the track. With just tree cover as the issue, they look pretty similar to me at the start of the route.

Pink 935 Glonass, Red 935 Galileo, Yellow 935 GPS

Image 5 – All of them

Pink 935 Glonass, Red 935 Galileo, Yellow 935 GPS, Blue Suunto, Pink Suunto, Orange Suunto, Green V800

You’re still looking for the red line being the GALILEO track. Looking from the right, it does seem like it is the more extreme of all the lines as I run from right to left. It IS further up than it should be but it’s tracking the DIRECTION of the correct line pretty well.

It has mixed performance compared to the others at the left side of the image

Image 6 – The Correct Route – Part 1

I appreciate I’ve confused you with lots of multi-coloured lines but hopefully they will pre-empt answers to some of the questions below.

Now I look at the best Suunto track, Galileo and the V800. BUT I will also try to draw on the CORRECT route (white)

The Green, V800 line is the closest to the correct route in white. The Galileo is still ‘Good’ but I would say the Suunto was slightly more Good. But, hey, they’re all good. I wouldn’t normally class Garmins like that. I’d more say Garmins were on the good side of acceptable.

Red 935 Galileo, Blue Suunto, Green V800, White ‘Correct’

Image 7 – The Correct Route – Part 2

This final image is perhaps more enlightening. The errors in part 1 were relatively trivial but here you can finally see that we are talking about big errors in tracking. These seem to be caused by 1) signals bouncing off buildings take longer to get to the watch and come from the wrong direction, this seems to throw the tracked route away from the building you are running close to and 2) guesses made in the long tunnel on Horse Fair (bottom right)

Red 935 Galileo, Blue Suunto, Green V800, White ‘Correct’

Clearly, the V800 (green) is best again. But both the other two are better than the average watch performs on the bottom right-hand side, even though it looks bad 🙂

Very Tentative Conclusions

On the basis of a mere 3 miles of running today, I am certainly not going to suggest that you buy or upgrade your watch. Sample size 1 and all that.

I satisfied my curiosity that Galileo does seem to offer a POTENTIAL improvement.

Unfortunately and TENTATIVELY, it looks to me that Galileo has brought Garmin up to the ‘Good’ category but still not as good as the V800 or one of the better Suuntos using only GPS.

My guess would be that INSTANT PACE WILL BE IMPROVED but don’t throw away your running pod yet. It still won’t be as good as that.

So rather than dismissing Galileo out-of-hand, it looks like there IS something to have an extended interest in (or to even get mildly excited about). More research shall now ensue.

 

 

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Luís Pinto
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Luís Pinto

Very potential. Don’t forget only 14 available global satellites. At August more 4 available. 4 four will be launched in July. Right now you can view how many Galileo sat are near of your coordinates: https://in-the-sky.org/satmap_radar.php?year=2017&month=6&day=16

Luc
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Luc

Your link has a date from last year…

Luís Pinto
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Luís Pinto

Yes, just press the button on right ‘Reset time to now’ or change the link to https://in-the-sky.org/satmap_radar.php?year=2018&month=7&day=1. Then select the satellites constellations at ‘Select Satellites’.

Mirko
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Mirko

Congrats Luis Pinto, very nice web page.

Chris Hague
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Chris Hague

I’ll stick with my Stryd for distance and pace for now I guess

Luís Pinto
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Luís Pinto

If you scored again F935, which would be the % with gps+gallileo, from 79%, what would be the new rating?

Dario Zurcher
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Dario Zurcher

I did a couple of test with my FR935 as well. My first impressions are positive, but of course the statistical significance is low. Anyway, as Luis Pinto pointed out, it strongly depends on the availability of Galileo satellites. There are many Apps around, which allow you to check the number of GNSS satellites above you.
If you want to check it out:
https://www.strava.com/activities/1667435025/overview
The tracking quality slightly degrades in few places, where buildings/trees/hills reduce the signal. Anyway, it looks better than usual.

Guillermo Guerini
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Guillermo Guerini

I updated my 935 but I still don’t have GPS + Galileo. Looking at the release notes, I need to have GPS 2.20 but I’m on 4.4 with an exclamation point next to it: “GPS: 4.4 (!)”. This is the release notes:

“Added GPS + GALILEO support (Activity Settings > GPS). (Requires GPS version 2.20)”

What’s going on here??

Mirko Surf&Run
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Mirko Surf&Run

Nice and well written test review.

Justin
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Justin

Rubbish might be too strong of a term but does the job to get me to read it :P. It’s too early in the support life to get ANY real effective info on it. Right now it seems like they are using GPS as the point with Galileo as support (like Glonass). Galileo isn’t fully up and running right now anyway.

So I said before…this is all gimmick rather than a breakthrough.

Thomas Bruun Funch
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Thomas Bruun Funch

Either the update has improved Garmins smoothing algorithm, or Galileo is a much better choice for instant pacing. I found that on my Fenix 5, the pace was very smooth at various paces. I was quite impressed.

Justin
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Justin

I mean barring using Stryd for running (for instance pace and distance) or cycling (with a top of the line bike computer) having it for the everyday runner/cyclist will be beneficial due to the added accuracy. Once Galileo is fully operational, you’ll be getting amazing instant pace if the hype is true. That’s legitimate progress and pushing the bar.

There is no downside other than it being a giant flop or if Garmin’s antenna can’t handle the signal (or if the housing ruins it). The true test will be with next year’s Forerunner 935/Fenix successors.

Xuesong Zhang
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Xuesong Zhang

by the same token, Beidou, the Chinese copycat?