new STRYD – White Paper compares STRYD’s results to wind tunnel winds

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Link to: STRYD-wind-white-paper

Garmin 935 STRYD, STRYD Review, STRYD Power Meter, FootpodSTRYD has produced a White Paper looking at air resistance costs when running and, in particular, how their new product handles such conditions by adjusting reported running power levels for wind.

The paper looks like a good start to me and the new STRYD seems to come out well. Perhaps some scientist out there can shed more critical eyes on STRYD’s own-published report?

Indeed STRYD are relatively cautious in their summing up

Stryd’s air power technology is the first to offer runners the real-time power they are using in the moment to overcome their unique local air mass resistance, including when running in both calm and windy conditions, and when running indoors and outdoors. However, the Stryd technology reported on in this white paper is continuously under improvement, as is with all run power technology at Stryd. As new improvements become available, they will be delivered to Stryd power meters as part of firmware updates that are designed to continue to give runners the most accurate, precise, and user-specific power data possible.

Perhaps one interesting point to note from the white paper is that STRYD is now saying that there *IS* an optimal placement on the shoe for the new STRYD…that being; pointing forwards, on the laces and towards the toes.

STRYD Review 2021 Update after 2000 miles | Running Power | Footpod Meter |

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “new STRYD – White Paper compares STRYD’s results to wind tunnel winds

      1. Which is another way of saying they can’t detect negative pressure (tailwind) they can only detect a lack of a headwind (even if it’s just a headwind caused by your motion into still air).

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