Suunto 7 Review | Best Wear OS Smart Sports Watch ?

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Suunto 7 Review

Suunto 7 ReviewHere is a summary of my time with the Suunto 7 followed by a discussion around some of the more interesting details that cover my experiences with the Suunto 7 including its accuracy, I was going to write a more detailed Suunto 7 Review but stopped at 3200 words.

Simply summarised “The Suunto 7 is by far the best smart, sports watch for Google’s Wear OS” and from a personal perspective, I’d muchrather have a Suunto 7 than an Apple Watch.

or…

Simply summarised, “The Suunto 7 is over-priced with an under-featured, proprietary Wear OS app” and from a keen athletic perspective, I would personally choose a different watch as I do LOTS of sports.

Updated: 1 July 2020 KEY ISSUES FIXED

Suunto 7 Review Summary
  • Price - 80%
    80%
  • Apparent Accuracy - 85%
    85%
  • Build Quality & Design - 98%
    98%
  • Features, Including App - 90%
    90%
  • Openness & Compatability - 95%
    95%
90%

Suunto 7 Review Summary

Suunto 7 Review

Suunto 7 is a NEW DIRECTION for the company. The whole concept of Wear OS is new to both Suunto and much of its traditional customer base.

Wear OS gives Suunto inbuilt smart capabilities and the strategic ‘app store’ they have missed for the last few years. With one fell swoop the Suunto 7 ‘easily’ has contactless payments, music, Google Assistant, Google Maps, Google Fit, activity tracking and a plethora of other apps

In my opinion, this is a good SMART watch from Suunto with BAGS of potential of the sports side of things. The Suunto 7 exudes quality & speed compared to many competitor Wear OS sports watches which exude mediocrity.

It looks great. The screen looks great and the watch feels great as you use it throughout the day.

I’ve used the watch for 50+ hours of running, pool swimming, cycling, indoor cycling, weights and treadmill running. Is the Suunto 7 perfect? A: No, definitely not. The in-sport experience is limited compared to dedicated pro-sports watches, yet Suunto’s ambitiously-scoped app is streets ahead of most other sports apps on Wear OS. Nevertheless, there are improvements needed to keep everyone happy.

For the Suunto 7’s chosen target market, the Suunto 7 is ‘almost there’ and needs both the ability to customise sports profiles and properly integrate activity data in Google Fit with the Suunto Android app. The price is steep but I would rather wear and use a Suunto 7 for 24×7 usage than either an Apple Watch, Garmin Venu or Casio WSD-F30. Q: Why so? A: Aesthetics and smarts.

 

Pros

  • Spotify & Google Play Music (Wear OS), plus music rips
  • Onboard, cached Mapping plus other 3rd party mapping options
  • App Store (Google Play) and the ability to install MANY apps
  • NFC Payments (Visa, Mastercard, Amex Wear OS via the superior GPAY/Google PAY)
  • Quality construction with a GREAT, LARGE touchscreen and decent buttons
  • A good Suunto Wear OS app which supports most sports, with many more sporty apps in the Wear OS app store.
  • Optional ‘always on’ screen for exercising

Cons

  • For map routing you will need to use one of the many 3rd party solutions like Google Maps (March 2020)
  • Battery life is good for a Wear OS watch and when compared to the Apple Watch or almost all other SMART watches. But the battery is not up to the same level as a ‘pro’ sports watch (with a poor screen).
  • Suunto 7 is a larger format watch, perhaps not suitable for the skinny-wristed amongst you.
  • 3rd party apps must be used to support sports sensors such as STRYD by using Ghost Race/SportyGo
  • oHR and GPS accuracy is comparable to competitors ie meh-to-good.
  • Serious triathletes and pro-adventurers are best advised to choose a sport-specific watch…but you already knew that.

Suunto 7 Review – What is it? and why the controversy?

The Suunto 7 is a smart sports/outdoors watch for Wear OS, simple as that. As such it is mostly competing with other SMART watches like the Apple Watch, Casio WSD-F30 and the Samsung Galaxy Watch Active.

It’s just not correct to compare the Suunto 7 to other high-end Suunto watches. They are targetting different markets and so a different feature set is appropriate for the target market. And it’s not right to compare the Suunto 7 to competitive high-end sports watches, the Suunto 7 is clearly targetting SMARTs because of the reliance on the Wear OS platform.

However, it is perfectly valid to compare the abilities of Google’s Wear OS platform to Apple’s Watch OS platform but that is mostly beyond Suunto’s control. And it’s perfectly valid to compare Suunto’s Wear OS app to other sports and outdoors apps, both in terms of the app itself and how it integrates with the wider Wear OS environment (Google Fit)

Finally, of course, absolute comparisons like PRICE are perfectly valid too.

So where any ‘controversy’ does exist, it’s because people are not making valid or fair comparisons…at least that’s my opinion of their opinions. You can make your own mind up as my regular readers here tend to be a clever bunch who like to hear different opinions rather than jumping into their favourite echo chamber.

Suunto 7 Review

Suunto 7 Review – What is it in a bit more detail?

Well, in my opinion, it’s a well-made, good-looking, large-format smartwatch. It feels like the physical watch should be able to handle the rigours of the outdoors and, perhaps more importantly, it has a comprehensive set of sensors that, at least in theory, enable the software to do awesome things. So it has

  • GPS-Galileo satellite capabilities which give positional and directional (compass) information (Qualcomm)
  • Optical Heart Rate Monitor (Pixart)
  • Barometric altimeter that supports further refinement by GPS altimetry (FusedAlti)
  • An accelerometer that detects movement and, for example, refines speed as determined by GPS
  • Microphone – for voice access to smart functionality
  • NFC/Payments chip for tap and pay
  • WiFi chip to, for example, talk to your home speakers
  • Bluetooth 4 to pair to sensors (with caveats) like speakers
  • And the battery, buttons and touchscreen make it all work

 

The software operating system it runs is Google’s Wear OS, which can work on an iPhone but it’s really designed to aid a better integration with Android smartphones. Many, but not all, of your favourite Android apps, will also have a cut-down version or partner version that works on Wear OS watches – thus Suunto has made an app for your smartphone and a Wear OS app for the Suunto 7. That’s just one app on the watch, but you NEVER have to use it if you don’t want to.

Wear OS on your Suunto 7 will run apps that can do wonderful stuff like KOMOOT, Google Maps, Strava and MUCH more. And it also runs the Suunto Wear OS app. More on that in a minute.

Apart from apps, Wear OS supports thousands of watch faces, including a special heatmap watch face from Suunto, and special screens called ’tiles’ which are always-on and can be swiped over the watch face from time-to-time.

Then we come specifically to the Suunto Wear OS app. As Wear OS apps go, it’s awesome in the intended scope. Its mistake, perhaps, is to look a little too much like the exact-same interface style used on Suunto’s other high-end watches. As it looks the same, people seem to expect it to have the exact same functionality as these other watches. It doesn’t. But compared to other, Wear OS sports apps it DOES already have good functionality…admittedly, perhaps not the pro-athletic levels of functionality found on sports watches.

Suunto 7 ReviewSuunto 7 Review – What Is The Target Market

The Target Market Is An: Active person looking for a smartwatch

First and foremost, I’d say it’s for people who use an Android smartphone and who want a decent-looking, well-integrated companion watch. They will want to buy that watch also for its smart functionality, perhaps the ability to play music, make contactless payments and/or for Google Assistant.

Maybe the target buyer is interested in a bit of activity tracking. Maybe.

Probably the target buyer will be interested in sports usage but not to the level of a serious athlete or multi-day adventurer.

So what does that sound like? Yep. To me, it sounds like an alternative to an Apple Watch. NOT an alternative to a Suunto 9 or Garmin Fenix 6 Pro Solar or even to a top-end Garmin Forerunner running watch. Suunto devotees may scoff, and rightly so, this is not a watch for them. But hey, the Apple Watch is the best selling wearable…EVER. There REALLY is a HUGE market for this sort of thing. Honest!!

OK, there’s the price too. But I’ll gloss over that for a while.

Suunto 7 Review – More on how it all works

This is not a review of  Wear OS.

I like Wear OS. The Suunto 7’s buttons and touchscreen are a good interface to Wear OS, on the whole.

The Suunto 7 works well.

Out of all the Wear OS watches I’ve used, this offers one of the very best usability experiences. It has the most powerful processor and there are no lags worth noting, except perhaps things seem to take longer to download over my WiFi Mesh network+fast internet connection when an app is installing.

 

Suunto 7The Suunto HEATMAP watch face is great. You can display a zoomed-in or zoomed out heatmap centred on your current location for any sport or class of sports. It’s not THAT useful, but it is clever and looks nice!

Furthermore, you can configure two complications on it, I chose to add a shortcut there to GPAY and another to show the battery status. Instead, you could probably have a running total of your steps or similar.

If I then swipe to my chosen tiles I have the following

  • My current week of training 9 (a Suunto tile)
  • My current month of training (a Suunto tile)
  • Google Fit showing my active minutes and heart points
  • Weather forecast
  • You can also see your 24×7 HR if you are into that sort of thing. It looks like it only gives infrequent readings (15 minutes). Which is not great.
  • then there are timers, calendars, other heart graphs and news headlines to choose from. But no compass 🙁 you’ll need an app for that.

Other than APPS, the remaining areas of the Suunto 7 to consider are CONTACTLESS PAYMENTS, MUSIC, Google Assistant, the battery that powers it all and the accuracy to which it is all delivered. Let’s look at those…

Contactless Payments

Suunto 7 ReviewI’ve set up a couple of my credit cards on the Suunto 7. I’ve also put a shortcut to GPAY on the watch face which makes the payment really simple.

The only caveats are

  • GPAY requires you to have a passcode set for the Suunto 7. If you take the watch off you have to re-enter the passcode. There is probably also a time delay after which you have to re-enter the passcode but I’ve not encountered that and, if it exists, it must be several hours. Hence payments are VERY, VERY easy.
  • Google PAY / GPAY – you can pretty much add ANY Amex, Visa or Mastercard to the Suunto 7 (supported services). This is similar to Apple PAY but Garmin PAY is restrictive in its support for payment sources. On the downside, GPAY only works in these countries.
  • Paypal is not supported – it’s only supported in the Google PLAY Store.

FWIW: For Garmin PAY I had to apply for a special credit card to get any form of payment method working for me in the UK, which is fine, but Google PAY took all 5 cards that I currently own.

Summary: Great. Far more flexible that Garmin and similar to Apple. At least it was for me…

Music

Suunto 7 Review

You can use the streaming services Spotify and Google PLAY Music to locally cache music and playback at your leisure. You can also have rips/downloads. It seems to try to stream over WiFi too.

I had no pairing or playback issues with my Jabra Elite 65t earbuds but I did have some issues when casting to specific speakers in my ‘smart home’.

Summary: Fine for standalone playback to earbuds and controlling your phone’s audio.

Google Assistant

I’m a partial fan of the Google Assistant and its integration with: my smart home; fairly smart car; and its ability to answer questions without getting angry even when I shout at it. I also have an iPhone XR and Google Assistant is better than Siri.

The Suunto 7 has a microphone and screen as an interface to Google Assistant but it has no speaker and hence should know if you have earbuds paired or if there are Google Home speakers available over WiFi (Mesh).

I’m not convinced that the Suunto 7 really tries to use my WiFi as often as it might, it seems to very much prefer to communicate with my Android smartphone. So, by my command, it does initiate music on the smartphone and playback on my earbuds and it also will also show a pretty picture of BAKU on the Suunto 7 when I ask “What’s the capital of Azerbaijan?”.

As I have numerous connections points/microphones in my house I’ve not got to the bottom of what the Suunto 7 is/is not doing here. And I don’t propose to spend any time figuring out why it only ‘kinda works’.

Summary: Needs fine-tuning for a Smart Home but seems fine as a companion to your android smartphone.

Battery – How long it works for

Suunto claims 12 hours of GPS usage and 20 hours of non-GPS sports usage, which is good for this type of watch. Although, in my experience, I reckon you will get 9-10 hours of GPS usage from a full charge depending on the exact sports usage. This will be further reduced if you have the screen set to ‘ALWAYS ON’ and the screen brightness cranked to the max. Start playing music and battery life will be lower still – that’s true of all smartwatches.

From a practical viewpoint, if you look at your 4-5 hour marathon you also have to account for depleting the battery the night before and on the journey to and from the race. Will you make it through that race? Probably. However, if you wake up and put on the watch fully charged all will be good. I tried this ‘test’ as follows

Suunto 7 Review

  • 8 am. wake up and turn the fully charged Suunto 7 on
  • 9 am to 1 pm bike ride with GPS enabled, stopping indoors (poor GPS in a coffee shop) for 30 minutes
  • 1 pm to 2 pm outdoor run, no music
  • At this point, the watch read just under 50%. I think it was 48% or 46% (ie 10% depletion per hour)
  • After that and using normal ‘watch’ mode, the reading fell to 21% by 11 pm.
  • 9 am: wake up and the battery saver watch face was showing

So my point to fitness freaks is that the S7’s battery is sufficient for your marathon. A 4-hour marathon with music might also be possible.

Would the battery life be sufficient to give you a day’s navigation over the hills whilst linked to your smartphone and listening to music?…no.

Summary: The Suunto 7 has awesome battery life for a Wear OS watch and also good when compared to the Apple Watch. Of course, YOU will almost certainly want better battery life. Good luck with finding it in a directly comparable product!

 

Activity Tracking on the Suunto Wear OS APP

Suunto 7 ReviewThe Suunto 7 tracks your activities fairly well. Activities mean ‘your non-sporty exertions’…like climbing the stairs or walking 500 miles just to be with someone. it also covers non-exertions like sleep tracking.

Well, when I say it tracks activities fairly well and also covers sleep, what I mean is that Google Fit works for the former and you will need an app like Sleep as Android for the latter. You could probably also use another stair-climbing, step tracking app to capture activity too. But the bottom line is that activity and non-activity (sleep) is piped into the Google Fit ‘service’, which is great. What’s not great, for some people, is that the Suunto android app does not retrieve that data.

I can’t believe that this won’t be added QUICKLY by Suunto. It wouldn’t bother me as an owner of the watch but I’m positive this omission will REALLY hack some people off. After all, Suunto has specifically said that the Suunto 7 targets an “Active person looking for a smartwatch“. Presumably, an active person wants to track activity?

Me? I’m just bothered about the smart stuff and sporty stuff and that the sport stuff syncs back to the Suunto android app. Talking of which…

General Sports on the Suunto Wear OS APP

Suunto 7 ReviewThe Suunto 7 is for active people rather than athletic wannabees and multi-day, extreme adventurers. As such, the Suunto APP supports all major single sporting activities. Clearly it is still work-in-progress so I won’t dwell too much on what might be added soon.

Whilst the onboard Suunto Wear OS APP does not support external Bluetooth Smart sensors, the Suunto 7 does support them via 3rd party apps. But what you lose with 3rd party sensors, you gain with onboard maps integrated into the Suunto 7’s Wear OS app. Try finding maps on a Garmin Venu.

Interestingly the Suunto app allows both MANUAL and AUTOMATIC laps but doesn’t yet support either interval training, adaptive training or sports mode customisation. At least not yet.

Running Differences

Suunto 7 Review

Not all running metrics were available on the Suunto 7 at the time of writing; cadence, pace, distance, time heart rate and others are either displayed or recorded.

Running Cadence & Pace (FusedSpeed) come from arm-movements and GPS – both taken into account. Thus indoors on a treadmill, you get pace estimated solely from arm movements. My further understanding of WearOS is that the GPS on your phone will be used if the phone is present. On a normal run, with your phone at home, Suunto 7 will use the onboard GPS/Glonass/Galileo chip from Qualcomm.

Cycling Differences

The Suunto Wear OS app doesn’t support power, speed or cadence sensors but will give you GPS-speed, distance, time, lap, elevation and HR data either on the watch or on the app. You will get richer cycling functionality on sports-specific devices like the Suunto 5 and Suunto 9.

Suunto 7 ReviewSwimming Differences

Swimming functionality supports differently sized pools as well as detecting your stroke, pace, intervals and laps. Plus there is the added bonus of heart rate from swimming. Not all of that is displayed right now but it is recorded back to the Suunto android app.

Outdoors Differences

The Suunto 7 boasts heatmaps and free offline maps with a variety of styles, none are available on any other Suunto. Along with the quality feel of the hardware, ‘maps’ might be why Suunto believe they can justify a high price point. Also packed in are a barometer and GPS-altitude as well as FusedAlti, which combines the two. You get the vertical speed and weather functions and a compass can be delivered with several Wear OS app options.

But what’s missing from the Suunto Wear OS app is waypoint navigation and route navigation. You just can’t sync the routes from your Suunto smartphone app to the watch (yet). Of course, there ARE other Wear OS apps that can provide routing and, indeed, you might even prefer to do that by installing Google Maps or one of the many apps that leverage Google Maps or other map services.

Suunto 7 Accuracy

There’s a lot to say about the accuracy but it can be summarised as similar to competing devices but with the need for a bit of fine-tuning (that will come).  Here is a link to a detailed post covering many aspects of Suunto 7 accuracy for those of you who are interested. There are some new results added in there but they just confirm my initial findings. Note: This post is available only for supporters to access…that first sentence summarises the accuracy results.

Suunto 7 Accuracy

Suunto 7 Review – Extras

Part of enjoying the Suunto 7 is discovering new ways of using Wear OS and, especially new Wear OS apps. These might help.

  • Exercise Timer – Helps with intervals
  • Gesture Launcher – Tap, draw and open something else whilst using the Suunto Wear OS app eg a compass app
  • SportyGo – Now has support for CALIBRATION of STRYD (Review here for more info), support 3rd party sensors   !!
  • GhostRacer – Similar, plus other features
  • Baro Trend – Shows trends…of barometric pressure, nice look and feel
  • Compass for Wear OS – Guess what this one does? 😉 I’d like a compass as a tile
  • Wear OS on the Android smartphone has a ‘screen always on’ setting but to make this work you must set it in the Suunto app

Please feel free to make suggestions below in the comments section and I will add them here.

Suunto 7 – Updates

I’ll add links to other posts which details software updates made after launch

Suunto 7 – more to routes than meets the eye

 

 

Futures – Suunto 7 Review

Google is probably addressing developments to Wear OS including support of peripheral functionality like SpO2 monitoring and whilst there are many use cases like ovulation/fertility tracking that I believe are not integrated into Google Fit, apps do already exist for those purposes.

Suunto 7 Review
Suunto 3, 5, 7 and 9

Putting that to one side, what Suunto need to address in short order are just these three things

  • DONE: Proper integration of the Google Fit data into the Suunto android app. It’s a silly omission even if there are workarounds.
  • DONE: Custom sports profiles. Now available, but the devil is in the detail

and in the medium-term, it would seem sensible to

  • Add routing & routing guidance within the Suunto Wear OS app to partner the map/routing functionality in the Suunto android app

In the longer term many enhancements could be made to the Suunto Wear OS app but their introduction will be mitigated by the existence of similar functionality in other Wear OS apps.

Whilst the Suunto 7 is a great quality piece of hardware I’m sure that we will see even better cases offered for the Suunto 7 later this year…it’s what Suunto do!

My opinion is that the Suunto 7 is here to stay – in terms of name, format and target purpose/audience. I’m expecting that this strategic change for Suunto will pay off and that they will iterate newer versions of the Suunto 7 in the years to come.

 

Buy Suunto 7 Discounts, Pricing and Availability

In the USA you are looking to buy the Suunto 7at an rrp of $499 and in the UK it’s GBP429 and in the EU it’s 479€ to buy. these ARE discounted though. The best prices I’ve found are linked to in the red banner below at Wiggle in the UK/EU and REI in the USA where members get $50 off.

Q: Is it good value-for-money?

A: There is nothing directly comparable, except perhaps the Casio WSD-F30 the Suunto 7 is better than that and a tad cheaper. Do you get a large robust screen on an Apple Watch? No. Do you get such a range of smart features on a Garmin Venu? No. But then the Garmin and Apple clearly have other strengths.

 

Suunto 7 Review
TBT Routing from Google Maps initiated by Google Voice Assistant
Suunto 7 Review Summary
  • Price - 80%
    80%
  • Apparent Accuracy - 85%
    85%
  • Build Quality & Design - 98%
    98%
  • Features, Including App - 90%
    90%
  • Openness & Compatability - 95%
    95%
90%

Suunto 7 Review Summary

Suunto 7 Review

Suunto 7 is a NEW DIRECTION for the company. The whole concept of Wear OS is new to both Suunto and much of its traditional customer base.

Wear OS gives Suunto inbuilt smart capabilities and the strategic ‘app store’ they have missed for the last few years. With one fell swoop the Suunto 7 ‘easily’ has contactless payments, music, Google Assistant, Google Maps, Google Fit, activity tracking and a plethora of other apps

In my opinion, this is a good SMART watch from Suunto with BAGS of potential of the sports side of things. The Suunto 7 exudes quality & speed compared to many competitor Wear OS sports watches which exude mediocrity.

It looks great. The screen looks great and the watch feels great as you use it throughout the day.

I’ve used the watch for 50+ hours of running, pool swimming, cycling, indoor cycling, weights and treadmill running. Is the Suunto 7 perfect? A: No, definitely not. The in-sport experience is limited compared to dedicated pro-sports watches, yet Suunto’s ambitiously-scoped app is streets ahead of most other sports apps on Wear OS. Nevertheless, there are improvements needed to keep everyone happy.

For the Suunto 7’s chosen target market, the Suunto 7 is ‘almost there’ and needs both the ability to customise sports profiles and properly integrate activity data in Google Fit with the Suunto Android app. The price is steep but I would rather wear and use a Suunto 7 for 24×7 usage than either an Apple Watch, Garmin Venu or Casio WSD-F30. Q: Why so? A: Aesthetics and smarts.

 

Pros

  • Spotify & Google Play Music (Wear OS), plus music rips
  • Onboard, cached Mapping plus other 3rd party mapping options
  • App Store (Google Play) and the ability to install MANY apps
  • NFC Payments (Visa, Mastercard, Amex Wear OS via the superior GPAY/Google PAY)
  • Quality construction with a GREAT, LARGE touchscreen and decent buttons
  • A good Suunto Wear OS app which supports most sports, with many more sporty apps in the Wear OS app store.
  • Optional ‘always on’ screen for exercising

Cons

  • For map routing you will need to use one of the many 3rd party solutions like Google Maps (March 2020)
  • Battery life is good for a Wear OS watch and when compared to the Apple Watch or almost all other SMART watches. But the battery is not up to the same level as a ‘pro’ sports watch (with a poor screen).
  • Suunto 7 is a larger format watch, perhaps not suitable for the skinny-wristed amongst you.
  • 3rd party apps must be used to support sports sensors such as STRYD by using Ghost Race/SportyGo
  • oHR and GPS accuracy is comparable to competitors ie meh-to-good.
  • Serious triathletes and pro-adventurers are best advised to choose a sport-specific watch…but you already knew that.
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Matz Runner

Hello, thank you for the review. I also own and tested this watch for the last 3 weeks, especially it‘s sport activity recording (running/pool swim). Generally I would sign your review, but sometimes I got the impression this review aims to make this watch looking good, especially considering the very bad review of DCRainmaker. There‘s no point to further comment on short battery performance, it‘s known and probably accepted. One may emphasize the good Performance on GPS recordings. But one definitely also has to comment it‘s very bad optical heard rate recording. And outside Suunto App, OHr recording at probably 15min intervals is basically ridiculous and unworthy for a company like Suunto. Basically, sport tracking and activity tracking should work when implemented as in Suunto 7. Suunto need to respond pretty fast to the complaints, else they‘re done.

martowl

I think you nailed it 5krunner. I have tested this watch quite a bit too and I find it is the only OHR that works for me and is better than my AW4 and as good as an S9b with a belt. So I disagree with @Matz Runner about the OHR. None of the other Suunto watches OHR has worked at all for me. I am an iOS user and I prefer the S7 to the AW4 because of familiar sports implementation. Battery life is as good as the AW4 for me so I don’t think anyone can complain about battery life, it is not meant to be an S9 or S5. Oh, I run ultras so the S9baro is my go to watch but I like the S7 enough that it has become my weekday watch. For gym workouts I sync the workout notes to GoogleKeep and play music from the watch….no need to have my phone (yeah!).

NotATechie

Not the watch for me. Cool concept though.

Question, what do you think Suunto will do when snapdragon finally releases the new processor? The 4100 or something like that.

Will they make a spin-off of the 7 or just implement new hardware and keep calling it a 7? Like they kinda/sorta did with the Suunto 3.

NotATechie

I just finished looking at the potential specs for the new snapdragon 3300.

If Suunto keeps the 7 name going forward they risk further confusion to their buyers. The potential improvements could make a successor to this watch vastly different.

So, I hope your speculation isn’t the case. On the flip side it seems like the consistency of naming will be nice.
Suunto 3 for the casuals
Suunto 5 for the poor athlete
Suunto 7 for the wear OS wannabe athlete
Suunto 9 for the athletes, adventurers, and anybody who gets battery/charge anxiety

tfk, the5krunner

yes that sums up the product categories. I guess I’d use different descriptions 😉

snapdragon3300. i need to look at that some more. ty for the bump

inSyt

Nice review. So this watch lays solid foundations for Suunto 7 Gen 2. Fully featured Suunto App, WearOS efficiency updates, smaller node Snapdragon chipset, dual frequency GPS chipset, (perhaps even a smaller display using a transflective always on screen). The dream is on.

tfk, the5krunner

no wear os app has the features that people are hoping for. i’m not saying it cant be done but…
anyway, some of the feature omissions i talk about SHOULD be added in short measure. more advanced omissions need another app to be used
wear os updates, yes as per my other post today these are being thought about but it must be WAY down the line for those
new snapdragon might be this yeay but i doubt suunto will use it for a year or two
dual frequency?? is that in the new snapdragon. not sure about that. i doubt it

inSyt

Yeah I agree the chances of it being done (for cheap over a short period of time) is like 0. It will require someone with resources that can cross subsidize like Suunto in this case or maybe even Google.

Does this watch not use the Sony chipset for GPS? Do have hope for Sony releasing a dual frequency GPS chip?

Gerhard

Qualcom 4100 uses Qualcomm WTR 2965, which do not seem to support dual-frequency. So I expect that there will be some more years until there is a watch with good GPS.

tfk, the5krunner

let’s see

Vlado

“SportyGo – Now has support for CALIBRATION of STRYD, support 3rd party sensors”……it has CALIBRATION, really?

tfk, the5krunner

that’s what Stefan said.
I asked him to do it. he said he did

Vlado

Thanks, i will send him a mail just if he can explain how does it work

qooapps

The factor is already added – since one week 🙂

John Kissane

Thanks for the review. Really like the idea of a WearOS based watch but this isn’t it as I’m a big fan of using my Stryd footpod for longer runs so no support for external sensors & the fact that the battery most likely wouldn’t survive my annual Comrades run (cause I’m slow 🙂 ) means I’m sticking to my 645. Maybe the maxim of don’t buy version 1 applies here?

Matt

“Best WearOS Sports Watch?”

I mean, to be fair, the pool is quite full of completely half baked sports watches. Standing out in that crowd isn’t challenging.

Also, your review reads like a Suunto fan trying to be as nice as possible. You can compare it to the AW4 or other WearOS “sports” watches to make it seem okay, but it frankly sucks as a sports watch (AW4 is an *alright* sports watch). Horrible battery life. Inaccurate oHR (“in need of fine tuning” – lol). Can’t natively connect to external sensors. Can’t customize data screens during activities. For $499!!

Look. It’s a decent watch if you want a good looking WearOS watch that tracks your occasional 5k run or ride and don’t mind spending $500 to do so. But it’s not a real sports watch. Suunto should not have put it in it’s series of sports watches.

Biased Much?

Hey,

You’re referencing my comments. My big issue with Ray was the tone and not content.

Both you and Ray have similar content, more or less. His tone was so much more negative. The tone in your article is more reserved.
However, the biggest difference is the perspective. You tried to identify where the watch sits and who this watch will appeal to.
I believe this is why your review seems more positive (a general understanding of the product/target demographic) and his seems so very negative. This led to Ray making comparisons with dissimilar products which made this bad watch seem so much worse.

tfk, the5krunner

yes, I *agree* with what you say.

I would re-itterate my earlier thrust that READERS surely do not want every review to be exactly the same. Intelligent people surely want to read different perspectives.

Matt

“This led to Ray making comparisons with dissimilar products which made this bad watch seem so much worse.”

So, let’s say Ford launched an all electric pickup truck. Looks exactly like the F150, but is all electric. Oh, but it also only has a 50 mile range. You can’t actually use it for a work scenario. Can’t tow anything more than a bike rack. Definitely no putting any more than 500lbs in the bed of the truck. But damnnnnnn, the screens in the truck were nice. It was basically silent to drive. It’s fast.

Comparing this brand new all electric truck to “old” trucks made by Ford and other truck manufacturer’s is pretty fair, despite it sort of falling into a different category. You can’t just say it compares only to other electric vehicles.. because it’s a pickup truck.. made by Ford. It may be a decent electric vehicle, but it SUCKS as a truck.

It’s not a perfect analogy, but it’s pretty darn close. You don’t get to just ignore who’s making it and what it looks almost IDENTICAL to. This is a CRAPPY Suunto adventure watch. It’s a decent WearOS sports watch.

jaam

Hi, Are you going to update your review for the Sept 2020 update which now includes:
Always on fitness tracking screen
Fused tracking which can extend battery life
Ability to import routes
Basic route navigation

tfk, the5krunner

the work is never-ending! lots of watches, lots of updates

thank you to everyone that supports this site

https://the5krunner.com/2020/09/11/suunto-7-much-more-to-routes-than-meets-the-eye/

Simone Marchi

Hello,
what do you think about the new Mobvoi Ticwatch Pro 3 GPS? Do you plan to test it?
I’m very interested to known if ticwatch 3 can compete with suunto 7 for hiking/trekking activities.

tfk, the5krunner

hi
i would trust the suunto WAY more than the Ticwatch and have no plans to test the latter

Dmitry

How to make download music to watch? There are no Google Play app in the Google store. Via Spotify can possible only stream

tfk, the5krunner

Are you asking how to do it or pointing out the craziness of Google supporting YouTube Music on IOS before WearOS?
YouTube Music for WearOS will be ‘soon’