new Coros Vertix 2s – Thoughts

coros vertix 2s review specsCoros Vertix 2s

TL;DR – Vertix 2 is internally refreshed with improved GNSS/GPS and oHR, plus climbing features new to the Coros ecosystem. Coros’ best has just got better.

Coros is non-commital when answering what the ‘S’ stands for in the all-new Coros Vertix 2s. The company DID say that the ‘S’ does NOT stand for ‘small’…maybe it stands for ‘sexy’, ‘super’ or ‘special’. No-one knows 😉

More: Detailed Coros Vertix 2 Review

What’s New

Coros Vertix 2s looks unchanged from its predecessor although it comes in 3 new colours – Earth, Moon & Space. However, inside are improved hardware capabilities and 14 new features, shared with other Coros watches whose hardware can support them.

New Features

 

The biggest new feature is for cyclists who can now mirror what the watch is recording onto the smartphone app on their handlebars.

Other new features include climbing optimisations, climbing workouts, multi-sport training plans incorporating climbing, bouldering mode, a virtual pacer for running, an easier FTP test, a redesigned workout screen, and a few other bits and pieces (see link for full details)

More: April 2024 Coros Features

Battery Life

The new optical HR sensor and GPS setup use more power. The battery is unchanged so the battery life worsens slightly but it’s still excellent and superior to the Garmin Fenix 7 Pro series.

  • Standard GPS Mode: 118 Hours (was 127 Hours)
  • All Systems On: 73 Hours (was 89 Hours) – GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, Beidou, QZSS
  • Dual Frequency: 43 Hours (was 49 Hours) – L1, L5

GNSS Chipset Integration

Algorithmic changes are said to improve the performance of CLIMB mode, specifically the ascent, with no claims for improving sports in other modes. However, the older GNSS chipset has been boosted to benefit from a redesigned antenna, which will impact accuracy across all sports.

Whilst both the old & new chips receive dual-frequency, 4/5 constellation GNSS positioning, I found the older watch didn’t always properly use both frequencies, the result was that recorded positions were sometimes ‘thrown away’ from buildings/cliff faces when close to them. All competitor dual-frequency chips seem to do this and it shouldn’t happen. The whole point of dual-frequency reception is to let watches discard incorrect distance measurements due to refracted or reflected paths from the satellite, a correct location can then be trilaterated (triangulated).

Note: Vertix 2 could record high-frequency GPS data at 10Hz but I don’t think Coros ever enabled that feature and I assume that’s still not possible.

coros vertix 2s review specs

Optical Heart Rate Sensor

Coros has switched the optical heart rate sensors it has used for some time in its armband. This ‘new’ sensor has a superior circular LED array design and Coros imply greater accuracy also from its multichannel abilities.

Watch Size

The watch is slightly lighter by 2g than its predecessor and 0.3mm deeper because of the new oHR design.

Eco Claims

Coros no longer supplies its waterproof, plastic storage box and now boasts more eco-friendly packaging made from recycled materials.

Where is the AMOLED screen?

Don’t be followed by what other companies are trying to do with AMOLED. If your sport requires uber-long battery life then AMOLED is not an option. Of course, most of us do not do those kinds of sports – long adventures, hikes and ultra runs…maybe climbs too as in much colder temperatures battery life is further shortened. Coros specifically targets these athletes with Vertix 2S, that’s why it is faring well commercially and that’s why it doesn’t need an AMOLED display.

Take Out

This is a climbing watch and it’s probably the best one on the market for that purpose. Yes, even better than the Garmin Fenix. Coros has doubled down its efforts to appeal to climbers with more climb-specific training features (released separately) and with a GPS mode that should be the best on the market at recording ascents/climbs.

Coros typically gives new software features to all old watch models that will run them. This is a great policy. However, this time around it’s probably backfired slightly. In a similar situation, Garmin might have limited the new features to this watch, called it a Vertix 2 Pro, and bumped up the price accordingly.

There’s not much to see here other than to say a good watch got better with a few minor upgrades to HR/GPS that didn’t quite always hit the mark on the original model.

Buy now:

 

 

the Coros Vertix 2 Review vs Garmin Fenix 6 Pro & Enduro – Everything You Need To Know

Reader-Powered Content

This content is not sponsored. It’s mostly me behind the labour of love which is this site and I appreciate everyone who follows, subscribes or Buys Me A Coffee ❤️ Alternatively please buy the reviewed product from my partners. Thank you! FTC: Affiliate Disclosure: Links pay commission. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

15 thoughts on “new Coros Vertix 2s – Thoughts

  1. At this price, this watch is DOA. No way. And by the way, how come Garmin doesn’t sue them for the design?

    1. i guess Garmin would have had to have patented some aspect of the design and for that to happen Garmin would have had to have invented it and it be novel.

      In the UK Garmin would have a lega case if Coros were ‘passing its watches off’ and effectively pretending they were Garmin. Coros is definitely not doing that.

      the rotating crown differs from Garmin Fenix/Epix

  2. All good until Garmin decides to sue them…
    I’m more prone to think that Garmin doesn’t sue them because for the time being they don’t see them as such a threat.
    In spite of the rotating crown, the Vertix still looks like a Garmin ripoff and again in spite of the same rotating wheel, Suunto Race doesn’t look like a Coros ripoff.
    Personally, if I have to vote for this V2S watch, they’ll get from me firm and sound “no”. Despite being a Fenix user for years, I can’t see why I’d want to buy the V2S. For my taste even watches like Suunto Vertical/Race are much better. Cheers!

    1. what aspect of the design would Garmin sue for exactly? Garmin didn’t invent a round screen or buttons and coros has COROS written on the bezel of some of its watches so it can’t be accused of ‘PASSING OFF’
      maybe I’m missing something?

      Look at the retangular smart watches that are very very similar to the Apple Watch. Apple doens’t sue for the same reason.

  3. Yes, it has that ugly COROS written on the bezel precisely not to confuse it with a Fenix. Go ahead and argue it as much as you want but it’s obvious that Vertix copies heavily the Fenix design.
    What aspect of the design they’ll sue them for, we’ll see if they decide to do it. As I said above, imo they are not interested to do it atm. We’ll see if they change their mind.
    And to repeat it (because ultimately it comes down to this): if I have to vote for that watch with my wallet, there’s no way I’ll buy it. Still looks to me like a cheap Chinese ripoff.

    1. I don’t particularly care either way. I guess it would make an interesting story if someone sued someone else.

      I’m trying to understand what coros can be sued for. just because it looks like a Garmin isn’t the grounds for a legal case in my understanding (it’s not: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passing_off). Garmin obviosuly hasn’t patented a round watch face or buttons or hands. perhaps someone else reading this can chip in.

    2. Jeff,
      I don’t understand where do you see the Vertix a Fenix clone. In fact, the real clone is the Instinct 2X (which I do have), which is a powered Casio clone. I have never seen such a sameless clone in other brand.

      I have had many Garmin watches. My Fenix 6X Pro Solar that stopped working. If you look at Garmin forums, there are a lot of cases that Fenix 6 watches crashing, Fenix 7 watches with stuck buttons or FR955 watches with bad altimeters and unusable HR values.
      So, sorry to disagree with your problems with Coros. My experience with the last top Garmin watches are that they seem more “chinese clones” nowadays than Coros. Latest Coros watches are incredible good and better for trail running.

      I have also have Polar, Coros and Amazfit (yes, Amazfit, a Chinese brand). The Amazfit T-Rex 2 I tested in my last 60k ultra, a dual band GNSS watch, was incredible accurate with the altimeter and the distance. Much better than the F6X I paid 1000 euros in 2019.

      Having a market made of different brands, is good for us as consumers. It forces brands to improve their products and maintain competitive prices if they want to remain in the market.

  4. You don’t care? And that’s why you wrote three posts? Your understanding doesn’t matter here. If Garmin decides to sue, their lawyers will neither ask me, nor you or consult your wiki link. Since you mentioned Apple, they are good example of a company which does sue.
    Regardless how many posts we write here, the V2/2S design is a blatant rip-off. Cheers

    1. you are just making an assertion of your opinion and not addresing the point of what you think Coros could be sued for.

      the wiki link gives an example (in the uk admittedly) of an associated element of law.

      AFAIK the main legal avenues open would be ‘passing off’ and ‘patent infringement’. obviously garmin won’t have patented a ’round watch with buttons’ but may well have patented specific inventions.

      I just can’t see how something looking a bit like something else making use of widely-used design aspects, constitutes any kind of illegality. Happy to be educated and boost my knowledge.

      you can see similar thoughts here linked to oura suing circular.xyz. https://the5krunner.com/2022/05/15/oura-sues-circular-ring/ . Oura is suing based on patent infringement. and here https://the5krunner.com/2023/11/16/ultrahuman-copies-oura-a-lawsuit-against-copying/ where oura sues ultrahuman. The latter example is perhaps more in line with the thoughts you may have about Garmin/coros (passing off). However Oura probably will get nowhere with that side of its argument as the examples of design elements they give are widely used by other companies.

      these kinds of cases are often used by large companies wanting to tie up smaller comapnies in expensive legal knots, restricting their ability to compete. Garmin could try to do that against coros (with no prospect of winning) and I suspect coros ultimately would not have the financial means to fight a long case. however it would create a bad PR look for Garmin.

      PS I wouldn’t disagree that coros’ earlier watch was a visual rip off of the garmin 235. I wouldn’t disagree that Vertix and Polar Grit X2 pro (titanium) do bear visual similarities to garmin fenix/epix.

  5. Dreamer,
    For me the Vertix 2/2S looks like a ripoff of Fenix whether you like it or not. Sorry. For the rest of the stuff you wrote I mostly agree with you. Basically, you are writing me the water is wet – can’t disagree. If Casio thinks the instinct is ripoff, I’d be glad to see they protect their interests in court. I can’t comment on the quality of Coros watches cause I’ve never owned one and I have absolutely no plans to buy one. Just a personal preference. I’m glad you enjoy them. So, sorry but I don’t have a problem with Coros and I’ll never have one.
    TFK, again neither me, nor you are lawyers. If Garmin decides to sue, your opinion and links you post wouldn’t matter. One thing it’s weird for me: a random guy pops up on your site and writes he wonders how come Garmin doesn’t sue Coros on design and you go all guns blazing. You can’t change my mind regardless of how many days you are going to argue. Live with the fact that I have an opinion and I won’t change it.

    1. 🙂
      hey you were polite, I hope I was polite…everyone’s a winner

      I almost always reply and my partner gets annoyed as I seem to always want the last word. I promise you can reply one more time and I’ll leave it at that 😉

  6. Nice watch, but to bulky for me. I was hoping for a 47mm version of this, maybe a Vertix 1s. Seems that i have to wait for the Apex 3 series.

    1. Yeah, before I knew about it my guess would have been for a smaller format watch without AMOLED. I suppose we’d have to look at the male/female demographics for ultra running and climbing to get a feel for a key part of the smaller wristed market (I’m smaller weisted too). I suspect the market FOR COROS is too small. just a thought

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

wp_footer()