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Training load analysis accuracy?
#1
Hey all, just sharing what I've experienece with my vantage M.

I had a half marathon run on 20th Jan and the training load shows that I'm overtraining, where my body indeed is fatigue for 3 days. I haven't been working out seriously and intensely since the run (I had about 3 crossfit workouts and 1 basketball session in-between until 26th Jan. The training load been showing that I'm overtraining on the 26th Jan too.

When the clock strike 00:00 (27th Jan), the training load just refreshed and show that I'm detraining. I'm just curious how did the algorithm works? And to be Honest, I just only feel that my body is slightly more ready for a more intense and regular workout on the 26th Jan. Although the training load algorithms are just an indicator. But I feel demotivated and disappointed over how inaccurate the function is.

Anyone face something similar too?
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#2
The calculation is well covered in Flow. It's TRIMP at its core, so nothing too fancy, therefore easy to calculate on your own.
Strain is a 7-day rolling average, and Tolerance 28-days rolling average of your training load. Your fitness status (productive, maintaining, et cet.) is the quotient of Strain/Tolerance. So depending on your history of training load, it's not unusual for the status to drop considerably, when a considerably high training load (like from a race) "leaves" the equation. Since you were "diagnosed" as overtraining I'm guessing your tolerance wasn't too high to begin with. The problem with Polar's model is that it uses just 28 days for your chronic stress (tolerance), instead of the standard 42-days of other TRIMP based models, like Trainingpeaks, Runalyze et cet. While this allows Polar to give somewhat sensible data much earlier, it also means that short breaks/recovery days are more heavily weighted than with the 42-days model.
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#3
(01-26-2019, 04:22 PM)PMV Wrote: Hey all, just sharing what I've experienece with my vantage M.

I had a half marathon run on 20th Jan and the training load shows that I'm overtraining, where my body indeed is fatigue for 3 days. I haven't been working out seriously and intensely since the run (I had about 3 crossfit workouts and 1 basketball session in-between until 26th Jan. The training load been showing that I'm overtraining on the 26th Jan too.

When the clock strike 00:00 (27th Jan), the training load just refreshed and show that I'm detraining. I'm just curious how did the algorithm works? And to be Honest, I just only feel that my body is slightly more ready for a more intense and regular workout on the 26th Jan. Although the training load algorithms are just an indicator. But I feel demotivated and disappointed over how inaccurate the function is.

Anyone face something similar too?

yes, what Flokon said looks spot on.

The trimp calculation is pretty simple and well-understood (I've used it elsewhere for many, many years). it is not gospel truth but I certainly REGULARLY take into account the ctl/atl/tsb measures that are derived from TRIMP

it depends on the input data being reasonably correct of course.

I would also say that it works best on workouts that involve sustained periods of raised HR. so an hour in the gym for me lifting weights would not get my HR above 120/130 for any great period and the trimp score would be very low yet the cost to my body would be higher.
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#4
Wink 
Have been training regularly for the past 6 months, I've seen the 1,6 cardio load before, and thought just as you did in the review that it would be impossible go beyond a 1,7 following a normal workout-regime. Read the review before buying the Vantage M and there you asked for people to show if you got over 1,7 without injury. Well.. 
After yesterdays race (half-marathon) I got a 1,8. Proof in the link  Wink Big Grin  (the language on the clock is norwegian, but you'll recognice the interface)

The accuracy of it? Yes, I do need a couple of days to rest my feet, but I will not recommend runners to plan their workout-routines from the feedback of training load.
I should add, I never have run this far before, so maybe that's why the training load went bananas!

1,8 cardio load



Regards,

Eirik   Smile
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#5
It's quite easy to go beyond 2.0. Let the cardio buildup drop below 28 days so there's no chronic load, i.e. tolerance, and continue with your regular training. After a couple runs your acute load will be so high, that the fraction strain/tolerance will be well over 2.0. I think mine was 2.7 at its peak. When your tolerance catches up, it will naturally normalize.
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#6
Smile 
(05-20-2019, 08:52 AM)flokon Wrote: It's quite easy to go beyond 2.0. Let the cardio buildup drop below 28 days so there's no chronic load, i.e. tolerance, and continue with your regular training. After a couple runs your acute load will be so high, that the fraction strain/tolerance will be well over 2.0. I think mine was 2.7 at its peak. When your tolerance catches up, it will naturally normalize.

It makes sense! If I delete my earlier entries in flow, it would be achievable I guess. Obviously, that ain't gonna happen!  Big Grin  Trying to slowly increase the load over time, so I guess thats why it's a rare ting to me!
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