Backpack| Quick Mention | Sport Utility Pack

I was recently and kindly sent the new SPORT UTILITY PACK by the inventor, Richard.

I don’t really carry bags/pack when running, although I frequently do carry larger hydration packs (eg CAMELBAK) on longer trail rides.

What took my interest was the mini-hydration and general ‘utility’ nature of the product for sport (hence the name of it, I guess šŸ˜‰ ). and the reason for that interest was the spate of very high temperatures recently in the UK (June 2017).

If I run for an hour then I probably would almost never hydrate as I run. Before, yes. Afterwards, yes. But not during. However with my Ironman training (and maybe your marathon training) clearly runs of well over 60 minutes regularly need to be done.

Let’s take a reasonable example of 90 minutes in the sun. I DEFINATELY needed to hydrate for that and probably fuel as well. However there’s no way I’m going to carry a 500ml bottle around in my hand for 45 minutes before I drink it. So my usual choice is either a 45 minute loop ending at my house (then repeated) or a trip via one of two water points at a not-so-local park, one of which has only just been repaired. Not ideal.

Bringing us on to the SPORTS UTILITY PACK which comes with a 325ml collapsible water container; apparently larger ones are available. This fits in the outermost of the two rear pockets. The innermost of the two pockets is larger and accommodates a Lucozade sport bottle (500ml).

Also included is a waterproof pouch that has two compartments and an attachableĀ mini bungy cord. So this sort of thing is ideal for money, a smartphone and the like. Yes I dislike carrying those on my upper arm too but sometimes I have to carry one for ‘app’ testing purposes. Probably handy too for you LIVETRACK-loving people.

It’s made of a material that is similar to the inside of a wetsuit and is lightweight which, if anything, helped a sweaty back by absorption/wicking rather than causing the sweat.

Here are my concerns:

  1. Chest strap to hold the arm loops together – this is my bugbear from one of my CAMELBAKs. Though actually the SPORTUTILITYPACK has wide straps and so never slid off my shoulders and hence never needed the chest strap!! Ta Da! [Bungy Cord provided can be used for this purpose)
  2. The supplied, re-usableĀ 325ml bottle is inadequate for my in-running hydration needs. It’s better than nothing but needs to be only a bit larger (500ml)
  3. The plastic pouch is probably generally weatherproof but I believe would not be waterproof in the even of total immersion eg whilst kayaking.

Summary For ME: Occasionally quite handy.

If you often carry stuff like a smartphone and keys and wallet then it’s probably a reasonable alternative to something like a CAMELBAK and you are helping a startup for less than Ā£30

Available here: https://www.sportutilitypack.com/

Yes I got a free sample, although I published this to help a startup and its a nice enough concept to bring to your attention if you are in the market for a sports pack of some sort.

 

 

 

5 thoughts on “Backpack| Quick Mention | Sport Utility Pack

  1. Thanks 5krunner for your review – all great points – to add a little response:

    1) CHEST STRAP – I do supply the pack with a small white cord that hooks between the straps – this acts as a chest strap and can be cut to comfort. As you say, it doesn’t really need it, but its there just in case – its up to the runner to choose.

    2) HYDRATION BOTTLE – The 325ml works for me, but I accept that others may need larger – would fit 500ml. But its not designed to a camel bak alternative – plenty of options in that market – its a running belt / waist pack alternative.

    3) WATER PROOF WALLET – As you say the pouch is not kayak water proof – rest assured I have run many times in heavy rain and it absolutely protects the phone – but I would not drop in water – if you need that level of protection there are specialist protectors that would fit the pocket. So I would advise the use of these.

    Finally, the price point is low because its designed as an alternative to running belts, waist packs and arm bands.

    I can offer your followers a free trial on the pack – as an avid runner I designed and built it purely for my self and if others like it I would be delighted to share.

    R

    • Hi Richard, great idea. Those hydration belts, cowboy-style, are a pain to carry, they keep bouncing up and down and they cut the skin more often than not unless you tuck your top in your shorts. Also as tfk said running with a bottle in your hand is a nonsense. How easy is to drink on the run? Just thinking loud, maybe your pack could be even better with the bottle at an angle so to slide it in/out without having to stop. Good stuff still.

      BC

      • BC –

        Great question. I looked at all sorts of ways to harnessing the bottle – ultimately slipping a bottle out/in of any harness whilst running is difficult. My approach is different – the soft bottle stays in the pack (the mouth piece sits just above the pocket), and you simply slip the whole pack off, sip and back on again. You don’t undo the straps. It slips up and off. BTW this is one of the reasons I used neoprene (as it maintains form) and why I have not built in a chest strap – so its easy to slip off/on. Once you have done this a couple of times its easy to do whilst running.

        To be open I am an avid but purely leisure runner – if your really concerned about maintaining full speed, then I would advise you look at the more professional hydration packs with bladders.

        R

  2. Not convinced to need a real pack to carry only 325-500 ml of hydration and a phone – and I live in a part of the world where you normally cannot go out on a 1h run without a liter of water.

    I mean, if you only need that little hydration you will survive without it.

    One 350 ml soft bottle in each hand will do the trick on shorter runs for me or if more than that is needed I’d recommend the Naked Band which is the only waist band that worked after I pretty much tried everything else out there. People even managed to stuff all mandatory gear for a grueling mountainous 100k race in there!

    Besides, wearing a black neoprene pack could get quite hot and that’s the last I’d want in the subtropics.

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