TomTom MySports Hits 1 million users

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TomTom Runner 2 Spark Cardio Music - Pairing Headphones

TomTom Runner 2 Spark Cardio Music – Pairing Headphones

TomTom just announced their quarterly results. There is little info in there that looks at their sports watches as that activity is grouped alongside other consumer products.

However one stand-out piece of info that slipped through this time was that MySports has now surpassed 1 million users. This growing platform probably totally reflects the sales of TomTom’s Runner 2/Spark and previous generation running and multi-sport models.

Recent announcements from TomTom include linking MySports to other software platforms including SportTracks.

Garmin Fenix4 and Fenix 4s HR for August???

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Garmin Fenix 4 Concept Source: Sylvain Gerber: http://goo.gl/DztAhw

Garmin Fenix 4 Concept Source: Sylvain Gerber: http://goo.gl/DztAhw

Garmin are doing a great job of releasing a major product each month. July was the nice looking, but not earth-shattering, Garmin Edge 820.

What about August’s release?

My bet would be something not so interesting. A lower key announcement such as a Garmin Swim 2.

Logic (aka rampant speculation) for August:

  1. It’s a quiet month
  2. There’s still a bit of open water swim season left in the Northern Hemisphere
  3. A bigger release could be planned for September/October at KONA (like the 920XT) and perhaps to counter whatever Polar might announce there (KONA is early October 2016)
  4. September is a better time to get some market traction started in the lead-up to Christmas and the big money season.

But. Just perhaps a pre-KONA announcement to counter the actual release of the awesome-looking Suunto Spartan ULTRA could be planned? That then brings us into Fenix 4 territory.

And please don’t question if there will be one. There WILL be. It might be called something else but it will be a Garmin Fenix 4 (possible features) in anything but name.

Garmin Fenix 4 Concept Source: Sylvain Gerber: http://goo.gl/DztAhw

Garmin Fenix 4 Concept Source: Sylvain Gerber: http://goo.gl/DztAhw

A little bird tells me there could be:

  • Fenix 4 Sapphire (Thanks Dave!!)
  • Fenix 4 HR
  • Fenix 4s HR (Sapphire)

You can guess that the HR models are using Garmin’s ELEVATE optical technology.

Whatever the Fenix 4 holds for us it will be interesting to see if it is evolutional (just mostly better hardware) or revolutional. I suspect strongly the former. The Fenix 5, and there IS one of those planned too apparently, might be more of a different move from the Garmin mainstream that we have become accustomed to.

Garmin Fenix 4 Concept Source: Sylvain Gerber: http://goo.gl/DztAhw

Garmin Fenix 4 Concept Source: Sylvain Gerber: http://goo.gl/DztAhw

 

 

 

 

Javier Gomez out of Rio Triathlon 2016

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AJ Bell London Triathlon 2015

Photo Credit: AJ Bell London Triathlon 2015

GOMEZ OUT

Javier Gomez is out of the triathlon at the RIO 2016 Olympics – a personal disaster, especially after winning the RIO test event. Obviously this boosts significantly the chances of a Gold for Team GB. Favourite in the women’s race is still USA’s super-Gwen. Tough competition in both races. Best wishes to every athlete’s ability to participate after training so hard.

Source: https://www.instagram.com/p/BH1kknJjmFC/

“I’m really sorry to let you all know that yesterday, when I was just about to finish my bike training, I had one of those silly crashes, no faster than 15km/h. Immediately I felt pain in my elbow so we went to the hospital. Scans have confirmed a displaced fracture in the radial head of my left arm. Going into surgery today to fix it.

“Unfortunately this has forced me to pull out of competing in Rio. I need to be realistic, there is no time to prepare and to be fit on the start line of the games. The most sensible thing is to open my spot and allow someone else the chance to race.

“As you can imagine, this is a really tough time, it’s a goal I have been working for over many years. I will keep fighting, I still have many goals in this sport, I’m not done yet. I feel sad and disappointed to give you this news, thanks for the ongoing support.”

Siento tener que anunciaros que ayer, justo cuando estaba llegando a casa después de un entrenamiento en bici, tuve una caída de esas que llamamos tonta, a no más de 15 km/h con la mala fortuna de hacerme daño en el codo. Acudí al hospital y las pruebas de imagen confirmaron una fractura de la cabeza del radio con desplazamiento. Hoy mismo seré operado. Este diagnóstico me obliga a renunciar al gran objetivo para el que llevaba toda la temporada trabajando duro, los JJOO de Rio. Siendo realista, no hay tiempo material para recuperarme totalmente y poder afrontar la competición en buenas condiciones por lo que lo más sensato es ceder mi plaza a alguien que lo pueda hacer mejor. Como imaginaréis, este es un momento muy duro para mí pero no voy a hacer un drama de esto, como siempre lucharé por recuperarme lo antes posible. Lo siento mucho por todos los que me apoyáis y animáis día a día pero, igual que muchas veces e saboreado la cara más dulce del deporte, ahora me toca lidiar con la más amarga. Gracias a todos de corazón. / I'm really sorry to let you all know that yesterday, when I was just about to finish my bike training, I had one of those silly crashes, no faster than 15km/h. Immediately I felt pain in my elbow so we went to the hospital. Scans have confirmed a displaced fracture in the radial head of my left arm. Going into surgery today to fix it. Unfortunately this has forced me to pull out of competing in Rio. I need to be realistic, there is no time to prepare and to be fit on the start line of the games. The most sensible thing is to open my spot and allow someone else the chance to race. As you can imagine, this is a really tough time, it's a goal I have been working for over many years. I will keep fighting, I still have many goals in this sport, I'm not done yet. I feel sad and disappointed to give you this news, thanks for the ongoing support.

A photo posted by Javier Gómez Noya (@jgomeznoya) on

Samsung Gear Fit2: Interview With the Engineers

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Samsung Gear Fit 2 Great GrpahicsEither Samsung treated me to an all-expenses paid trip to Korea or this is just a re-hash of a recent, but interesting, press release.

You decide.

—–Press Release Follows :- ) ——————————————————-

Samsung Electronics’ new GPS sports band, the Gear Fit2, is small but full of cutting-edge technologies. Six of the engineers who were deeply involved in the Gear Fit2 discussed how they worked together to set a new standard in fitness wearables, from choosing and assembling the preferred components to optimizing the functionality of the device.

 

 

Gear Fit2 HW Tizen Interview_Main_1

 

 

Q. When it comes to hardware, what is most notable about the Gear Fit2?

 

Chaekyu Choe: To improve performance as a sports band, we added a GPS, an application processor (AP) on the level of a smart watch and improved sensors.

 

With an embedded GPS, the Gear Fit2 allows users can go out and more accurately track their activities, like walking or running, without bringing along their smartphones.

 

By separating the LED and photodiode, both of which are needed to measure heart rate, we were able to use a bigger photodiode and enhance heart rate accuracy. Generally, many wearable devices have a combined module for the LED and the photodiode due to their small size. Also, the Gear Fit2’s barometer sensor, which is now about 10 times more precise, made it possible to measure elevation accurately enough to know how many stairs people climbed.

 

Putting all of the functions into such a slim design was difficult because the space was so limited, especially with the curved design. There are two buttons on the side of Gear Fit2, which restricts the space even more. In order to overcome these limitations, we considered how best to arrange components, how to minimize the space between chips, et cetera. We also had to reduce the number of components.

 

 

Q. How were you able to embed full GPS capabilities?

 

John Kim: The antenna has to receive the satellite signals, but getting it to perform well was a challenge. Antennas work better when they are further from the human body. However, as the Gear Fit2 is slim and has a detachable band, it was challenging to find an optimal spot.

 

So, a new method was devised: a hybrid antenna. In order to place the antenna as far as possible from the wrist, the antenna was embedded inside the display, and an assistant antenna was installed in another area, thus forming a dual antenna that enhanced performance.

 

Gear Fit2 HW Tizen Interview_Main_2

 

 

Q. How did you improve battery efficiency?

 

Hyukbeom Kwon: During the development, we found that power consumption can be reduced by controlling how often the GPS is accessed according to signal intensity. In general, exercise that requires GPS data is normally done outdoors where GPS signals are usually strong. So, we decided to make it turn on and off the radio frequency blocking function.

 

Through this low-power GPS technology, we were able to reduce power consumption significantly, so it uses about one-fourth the power of a regular GPS device.

 

 

Q. How does the automatic workout recognition work? And were there any challenges in developing this feature?

 

Wonhee Lee: The accelerometer sensor is used to identify the user’s motion first, and then the gyroscope sensor detects the direction and type of movement. Based on the sensor data, the Gear Fit2 can detect five types of workout – walking, running, cycling, elliptical trainers and rowing machine – and automatically recognize when those activities have been done for at least 10 minutes.

 

As there wasn’t any systematized database telling us “this workout is such-and-such,” we had to understand the data and figure out how to use it to identify each type of activity ourselves. To identify the exact type of workout, we had to get data from as many people as possible – because even for the same workout, the speed and intensity differ greatly depending on one’s age, height, gender, and so on.

 

Even after we found patterns for each activity, it was difficult to set a standard. For instance, when cycling, the Gear Fit2 detected not only changes in speed and direction, but also minute vibrations similar to what’s experienced when riding a small automobile. So we needed to find out how to distinguish between a car and a bicycle. Regarding workout equipment, there are so many types on the market depending on the manufacturer. Whenever we found an elliptical machine in a park or fitness center, we tried to use it.

 

Gear Fit2 HW Tizen Interview_Main_3

 

 

Q. What are some of the benefits of using the Tizen OS for developers and consumers?

 

Keunsang Han: Based on our experience developing the Gear S2, we learned a lot, such as data processing methods, communication technology between a wearble and a smartphone, and the sensor API.

 

From the user’s perspective, now anyone can develop applications or watchfaces for the Gear Fit2, and users can download and use it – that’s because Tizen OS-related SDKs are provided and there is an app store. You can find various fitness-related apps and watchfaces on Galaxy Apps.

 

 

Q. Was there anything unusual or different about the product development process?

 

Hyukbeom Kwon: Since the Gear Fit2 is a sports band, we had to test the performance firsthand, combining continuous field data with results from the lab. Even a minor modification to the hardware or software required more live testing. We would go outside, regardless of the weather, to conduct those tests. We walked and walked in the park, and exercised a lot.

 

Yonghak Lee: We had to consider how to customize the daily activity record for each region. For instance, we developed the screen in consideration of how Arabic script reads from right to left, and the 24-hour activity tracker needed to be modified according to time differences when going overseas.

Garmin Edge 820 & Edge Explore 820 – Formal Announcement

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Garmin-Edge-820-Youtube-Video

The Edge 820, again, was not one of the world’s best-kept secrets.

Here, below, is the formal Garmin press release for those of you who have not already seen the leaked details.

SUMMARY: It looks good, a bit of a boring evolution of the 520/810/1000 but I’d reluctantly buy it for the screen size. Available imminent. Hopefully less buggy than normal for Garmin due to similarities to 520.

OPINION: Garmin Edge 820

COMPARISON: Edge 520, Edge 810 and Edge 820

FULL SPECIFICATION: Garmin Edge 820

ALTERNATIVES: WAHOO ELEMNT or Garmin Edge 520 are both excellent. There are other alternatives but, sadly, they are probably not good enough. FWIW I also use a LEZYNE and a MIO/MAGELLAN from time-to-time just to ‘vary it’.

———– Press Release Follows —————–

We are so excited to today announced the Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820, lightweight and compact GPS cycling computers with comprehensive ride data, bike-specific navigation and the new GroupTrack1 feature. Riders can easily stay connected with family and friends, both in and out of the peloton, with the Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820’s numerous connected features including GroupTrack, which allows cyclists to easily keep tabs of everyone in their group should they get separated. To help create a safer riding environment, both devices are compatible with the Varia™ cycling awareness line and include built-in incident detection2. They also feature built-in Garmin Cycle Map with points of interest, bike-friendly trails and more in a compact design optimized for riding in any conditions. For cyclists seeking additional in-depth data the Edge 820 offers advanced performance monitoring including VO2 max3, recovery advisor, FTP and watts/kg tracking, performance condition, Strava Live Segments and advanced cycling dynamics4.

“We are excited to share the newest additions to our extensive cycling line-up with our announcement of the innovative Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820,” said Dan Bartel, Garmin vice president of worldwide sales. “Whether riders are chasing performance and racing goals or out for adventure and touring, the Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820 offer a full-suite of features to help track data that is important to them.”

Edge 820

Edge 820

Edge 820

Edge 820

Edge 820

Edge 820

Edge 820

Edge 820

With the Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820 riders can easily keep in touch with others in their pack. GroupTrack offers enhanced situational awareness by allowing cyclists to ride at their own pace while seeing where fellow riders are, so if one person falls out of sight, they don’t fall off the device’s map. Additional mapping features include preloaded Garmin Cycle Map for bike-specific turn-by-turn navigation, round-trip Course Creator and on-device course planning. Built-in GPS, GLONASS and altimeter provide accurate ride data so cyclists can know how far, fast and high they have ridden.

Pair the Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820 with the full-suite of Varia cycling awareness products including the Varia rearview radar, Varia Vision™ and Varia smart bike lights to help create a safer riding environment. Additionally, the devices’ integrated accelerometer for incident detection automatically sends a rider’s location message to emergency contacts if assistance is needed. The devices are also compatible with ANT+® sensors, including speed, cadence and heart rate.

The Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820 are ideal for riding no matter the weather conditions. Both devices feature a 2.3-inch high-resolution, capacitive touch display that is quick and responsive – even when wet or used with gloves – and the Edge 820’s ambient light sensor automatically adjusts the screen’s brightness so it’s easy to read at a glance even in direct sunlight.

The Edge 820 is compatible with ANT+ power meters, including Vector, the unique pedal-based power meter from Garmin that measures total power, left/right balance and cadence, and integrates with ANT+ electronic shifting systems and ANT+ bike trainers. Users can record advanced cycling dynamics to analyze their form, including where power is being applied on the pedal and throughout the pedal stroke. The Edge 820 also provides a variety of physiological data with the addition of a heart rate strap, so riders can view their cycling-specific VO2 max along with a recovery advisor, which analyzes their data and tells them how long they should wait before attempting another hard ride. Additional performance data includes FTP and watts/kg tracking, and in-ride challenges through Strava Live Segments.

Edge Explore 820

Edge Explore 820

Edge Explore 820

Edge Explore 820

Edge Explore 820

Edge Explore 820

Connect IQ compatible, users can customize the Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820 by downloading free data fields. Users can also stay connected while out on a ride via incoming smart notifications, including incoming call and text alerts from a compatible smartphone5. Additional connected features include live tracking, social media sharing and automatic uploads to Garmin Connect Mobile, a free online fitness community that provides easy-to-understand charts, graphs and maps to let users view their activities, track progress and more.

The Edge 820 and Edge Explore 820 feature up to 15 hours of battery life. The new Battery Save mode will extend battery life up to 50 percent by enabling the rider to wake the display only when it is needed while still tracking the details of a ride.

The Edge 820 is available for a suggested retail price of $399.99, or $499.99 bundled with a speed sensor, cadence sensor and a premium heart rate monitor. The Edge Explore 820 is available for a suggested retail price of $349.99.

Opinion: Garmin Edge 820

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Source: Garmin.com Garmin Edge 820

Source: Garmin.com

Garmin generally make great cycling computers. The Edge 820 looks to follow in that tradition.

The 820 is a clichéd EVOLUTION not revolution. Having said that it brings together much of what is good about the Edge 810, the Edge 520 and the Edge 1000. It’s a consolidation.

Having said that, I’m still not quite sure what it really is.

It’s also a foundation stone for supporting Future IQ development with Connect IQ BIKER Monkey. The 820, 1000 and 520 all share BIKER Monkey support which will continue beyond the end of this year – not so for the Aikido-Monkey based 630, 920XT, Fenix 3 and others. But even within the BIKER monkey Edge devices there are different hardware MEMORY/RESOURCES capabilities with the Edge 1000 being superior in some respects to the 520. I’m awaiting clarification on the Edge 820 but would imagine it will come in at least equal to the Edge 1000. Data Fields, Widgets and Apps are all allocated different resources and that is likely one reason why on some of the old Aikido Monkey devices (920XT) things start to get quite sluggish, quite quickly – you may have found the same to be true of the 520, in some circumstances.

There’s a 520 vs. 820 vs. 810 feature comparison table <here> and from that you will see that Garmin are very much progressing along a well established development route with many, often predictable, incremental changes.

That’s great though; the product still improves.

But what we have seen with the potentially market-leading Suunto Spartan ULTRA and SPORT and with the Wahoo ELEMNT Cycling Super- Computer is that other companies are saying “Let’s bin what we have and start a revolution”. Other companies are more dynamic and innovative in how they are solving our sporting problems and feubles. Suunto and Wahoo and others realise they HAVE to TRULY innovate to survive. And that’s a great thing.

Source: Garmin.com Garmin Edge 820

Source: Garmin.com

SCREEN and SIZES and HARDWARE

The 820 appears to have a near-identical screen to the 520. That’s a little disappointing. ie it’s a little bigger than the 810 and a little smaller than the 1000. Although the 820 DOES have colour touchscreen.

The unit size too is identical to the 520 although it comes in at 7 grams heavier.

Maybe those 7grams are the extra 8Gb in storage:-). There is no SD card slot😦

BATTERY LIFE

Not much seems to have changed here. 15 hours of normal usage BUT increased to 24 hours in ULTRATRAC mode. That’s potentially useful I suppose.

I find enabling all the bells and whistles and navigational features can SIGNIFICANTLY impact on stated battery life and indeed I’m not sure how well ULTRTRAC mode would work for more complex/detailed navigational tasks.

Source: Garmin.com Garmin Edge 820

Source: Garmin.com Garmin Edge 820

Newish To Garmin

Unsurprisingly the 820 supports VIRB control. But a nice new feature is GROUPTRACK RIDING. Essentially mimicing functionality introduced by WAHOO last year. Of course all your friends probably need an 820 too for the same functionality…I’ll have to check if the 820 supports your friends just having LIVETRACK on.

We also get some of the peripherally nice stuff like VO2max, FTP/w/kg , lactate threshold and stress scores as well as much improved STRAVA integration for those of you with a paid-STRAVA account (STRAVA Live Segments).

New to the 8xx Series

Like the 520, the 820 can now control compatible turbo trainers and Shimano Di2 shifters. It has connected features, live tracking, weather alerts, WIFI-upload compatibility and, unlike the 810, it has GLONASS.

Apparently it calculates calories. Yeah!

Source: Garmin.com Garmin Edge 820

Source: Garmin.com

Navigation

Yep it’s got that. No surprises there. But it is very similar to the Edge 1000 with proper routable mapping – except the screen can’t be rotated as on the 1000.

But is it really different?

Well yes there are clearly differences, I’ve listed some above.

But if you look at how the 920XT and the Fenix 3 changed from what were released to what they are now, then the Edge products appear superficially VERY VERY similar in most respects. Whereas the 920/F3 are SIGNIFICANTLY different.

If the 820 was called the 530 then I don’t think anyone would have been at all surprised. Especially people within Garmin as it WAS referenced internally as the 530!!!

Is it really expensive?

It’s coming in at £330 on the Gamrin website. But the 810 is shown there as £320! Reality on Amazon is much different where the Edge 520 is currently £195 and the Edge 810 is £235. So it’s probably got about £100 to fall on a good day to £250ish. You might have to wait a while for that to happen and even if you expect a Black Friday deal later in the year then I would not hold your hopes up too much as new products are less likely to be discounted…although maybe you could hope for a £150 Edge then.

And for all you non-Brits reading, pounds sterling are now virtually worthless so you should buy everything from the UK:-) £300 was about $20 when I last looked (joking…kinda).

Is it worth the upgrade?

This is a tricky one. Normally with a new Garmin I’d say to wait at least 6 months until the bugs are ironed out. However the 820 appears to be a 520 on steroids. So, with a bit of luck, there might not be too much wrong with it from Day 1.

On the other hand there’s not THAT much to upgrade for. Sure, if you have some of the super-fancy remote controlled bits and bobs and you like the latest device then you WILL get an 820. As you might also if you want decent navigation at that device-size and price point.

If you have a largely bug-fixed 520 I probably would not consider the 820 as they are too similar.

If you have an 810 then the argument is a little different as that really is starting to look a little dated. I tend to sell my Garmins whilst they are still in warranty before buying another one. If your 810 is working fine, then great, but NOW might be a good time to contact Ms eBay in advance of it breaking and/or the price drops too much before you get round to upgrading. Similarly if you are intrigued by Connect IQ functionality, which is probably where the new functionality of the future lies, then considering an 820 becomes more pertinent.

Summary

I’m a little bit bored writing this as it is not so different to other Garmin stuff. I should really be excited as I want to like the 820.

I’m a little confused too.

But it does look good.

I may well end up buying one to test it out and I know I WOULD welcome a slightly larger screen than the 520.

Would I recommend you to consider buying one? YES. But I’d also look at the 520 and the WAHOO ELEMNT.

Please help support this site in your next purchase by using one of these sites – always links to their normal low-priced deals.
US Latest Deals UK Latest Deals

Garmin Edge 1000 Explore (non-bundle) £345.00 Link $449.00 Link
Garmin Edge 1000 £345.00 Link $499.00 Link
Garmin Edge 820 £330.00 Link $400.00 Link
Garmin Edge 520 £176.00 Link $299.99 Link
Garmin Edge 510 £300.00 Link $329.99 Link
Garmin Edge 810 £197.00 Link $305.99 Link
Garmin Edge 25 £100.00 Link $160.99 Link
Garmin Edge 20 £93.50 Link $93.54 Link

 

Comparison: Garmin Edge 820 vs Garmin Edge 810 vs Garmin Edge 520

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Source: Garmin.com Garmin Edge 820

Source: Garmin.com Garmin Edge 820

So the Garmin Edge 820 is finally announced.

Here is a quick overview of a comparison to the Edge 520 and the more dated Edge 810. There’s not as many differences as you might think. I’m working on an opinion piece looking at these and other factors.

Basically: The 820 is a 520 with mapping and a few extra little goodies. The cut-down 820-EXPLORE variant is not worth buying, IMO, as it has neither power meter support nor workouts nor WIFI.

Physical & Performance Edge 820 Edge 520 Edge 810
Physical dimensions 73.0 x 49.0 x 21.0 mm 4.9 x 7.3 x 2.1 cm 2.0″ x 3.7″ x 1.0″ (51.0 x 93.0 x 25.0 mm)
Display size, WxH 58.4 mm 3.5 x 4.7 cm 1.4″ x 2.2″ (36.0 x 55.0 mm); 2.6″ diag (66.0 mm)
Display resolution, WxH 200 x 265 pixels 200 x 265 pixels 160 x 240 pixels, touchscreen
Touchscreen Yes No Yes
Color display Yes Yes Yes
Weight 67.7 g 60 g 3.5 oz (98.0 g)
Battery Rechargeable lithium-ion Rechargeable lithium-ion rechargeable lithium-ion
Battery life Up to 15 hours GPS training mode; up to 24 hours UltraTrac mode Up to 15 hours up to 17 hours
Water rating IPX7 IPX7 IPX7
GPS-enabled Yes Yes Yes
GLONASS Yes Yes
High-sensitivity receiver Yes Yes Yes
Barometric altimeter Yes Yes Yes
Unit-to-unit transfer (shares data wirelessly with similar units) Yes
Smart notifications (displays email, text and other alerts when paired with your compatible phone) Yes Yes
VIRB® control Yes
Maps & Memory
Basemap Yes Yes Yes
Ability to add maps Yes Yes
Accepts data cards microSD™ card (some versions include a City Navigator microSD card)
Waypoints/favorites/locations 200 200 200
Routes 0 0 Limited by memory space available
History Up to 180 hours Up to 180 hours up to 180 hours
Cycling Features
Compatible with Vector™ Yes Yes Yes
Multiple bike profiles Yes
Bike speed/cadence sensor Yes (Some versions) Yes (optional)
Performance Features
Heart rate monitor Yes (optional) Yes (optional) Yes (optional)
Virtual Partner® (train against a digital person) Yes Yes Yes
Courses (compete against previous activities) Yes Yes Yes
Auto Pause® (pauses and resumes timer based on speed) Yes Yes Yes
Auto Lap® (automatically starts a new lap) Yes Yes Yes
Auto Scroll (cycles through data pages during workout) Yes Yes Yes
Advanced workouts (create custom, goal-oriented workouts) Yes Yes Yes
Time/distance alert (triggers alarm when you reach goal) Yes Yes Yes
Interval training (set up exercise and rest intervals) Yes Yes Yes
Heart rate-based calorie computation Yes Yes Yes
Calculates calories burned Yes
Customizable screen(s) Yes Yes Yes
Power meter compatible (displays power data from compatible 3rd party ANT+™-enabled power meters) Yes (records data approx. 1 per second) Yes (records data approx. 1 per second) Yes (records data approx. 1 per second)
Temperature (displays and records temperature while you ride) Yes Yes Yes
Shock Resistant Yes Yes Yes
Garmin Connect™
Garmin Connect™ compatible (online community where you analyze, categorize and share data) Yes Yes Yes
Automatic sync (automatically transfers data to your computer) Yes Yes
Additional
Additional Compatible with Varia™ bike radar and lights: Yes Compatible with Varia™ bike radar and lights: Yes Operating temp: -20°C to +55°C
Edge® remote compatibility: Yes Edge® remote compatibility: Yes Connected features via smartphone: yes
LiveTrack: Yes LiveTrack: Yes GLONASS: no
Advanced performance and power analysis, including VO2 max, FTP/Watts/kg tracking, Performance condition/lactate threshold/stress score as well as advanced cycling dynamics, GroupTrack, in-ride challenges through Strava live segments and connected features Advanced performance and power analysis, including new Time in Zone, FTP tracking, cycling-specific VO2 and recovery and cycling dynamics Compatible with Garmin Connect™ Mobile: yes
Bike trainer profile for compatible Turbo trainer data display and control: Yes Bike trainer profile for compatible Turbo trainer data display and control This USB mass storage device is compatible with Windows® XP or newer and Mac®
On-device segment compatibility for dynamic and engaging in-ride competition: Yes On-device segment compatibility for dynamic and engaging in-ride competition
Operating temperature: -20°C to +55°C Operating temperature: -20°C to +55°C
Connected features via a smartphone: Yes Connected features via a smartphone: Yes
Compatible with Garmin Connect™ and Garmin Connect™ Mobile: Yes Compatible with Garmin Connect™ and Garmin Connect™ Mobile: Yes
Integration with Shimano Di2 electronic shifting: Yes Compatible with VIRB® action cameras: Yes
Weather alerts: Yes Integration with Shimano Di2 electronic shifting: Yes
Preloaded Garmin cycling map: Yes Weather alerts: Yes
Wi-Fi® compatible: Yes Preloaded Garmin cycling map: No
Ambient light: Yes Wi-Fi® compatible: No
Round-trip routing: Yes Round-trip routing: No
Route planner: Yes Route planner: No
Incident detection: Yes ¹ Advanced workouts require a Garmin Connect account
Training plans/workouts: Yes
Connect IQ™ store compatible: Yes
Audio prompts: Yes
ANT+™ electronic shifting compatibility: Yes
¹ Advanced workouts require a Garmin Connect account

Garmin Edge 820 – !! Here It Is !! Full specifications AT LAST

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Source: Garmin.com Garmin Edge 820

Source: Garmin.com

Here are the full specifications for the new Garmin Edge 820. It will probably be announced some time today. These are directly from the Garmin website. The product is internally stored at Garmin as the Edge 530. So the 530 and the 820 appear to be the same thing.

There is also an Edge 820 BUNDLE (still not released) probably including a HRM and speed/cadence sensor. Also a cut-down 820-explore that doesn’t support useful stuff like power meters..oh dear even a super cheap Polar or Lezyne bike computer would do that!

There are images at the end and an OPINION piece on the Garmin Edge 820 will follow.

A comparison to the 810 and 520 is <here>.

Overview

  • Lightweight and compact with 2.3-inch high-resolution, capacitive touch display that works with gloves and when wet
  • GroupTrack feature keeps tabs on everyone in your riding pack
  • Advanced performance monitoring includes VO2 max, recovery advisor, Strava live segments, FTP, performance condition and advanced cycling dynamics
  • Built-in incident detection included; compatible with cycling awareness accessories such as Varia Vision™, Varia™ smart bike lights and rearview radar
  • Bike-specific navigation preloaded with Garmin Cycle Map for turn-by-turn navigation

 

Physical & Performance
Physical dimensions 73.0 x 49.0 x 21.0 mm
Display size, WxH 58.4 mm
Display resolution, WxH 200 x 265 pixels
Touchscreen Yes
Color display Yes
Weight 67.7 g
Battery Rechargeable lithium-ion
Battery life Up to 15 hours GPS training mode; up to 24 hours UltraTrac mode
Water rating IPX7
GPS-enabled Yes
GLONASS Yes
High-sensitivity receiver Yes
Barometric altimeter Yes
Unit-to-unit transfer (shares data wirelessly with similar units) Yes
Smart notifications (displays email, text and other alerts when paired with your compatible phone) Yes
VIRB® control Yes
Maps & Memory
Basemap Yes
Ability to add maps Yes
Waypoints/favorites/locations 200
Routes 0
History Up to 180 hours
Cycling Features
Compatible with Vector™ Yes
Multiple bike profiles Yes
Bike speed/cadence sensor Yes (Some versions)
Performance Features
Heart rate monitor Yes (optional)
Virtual Partner® (train against a digital person) Yes
Courses (compete against previous activities) Yes
Auto Pause® (pauses and resumes timer based on speed) Yes
Auto Lap® (automatically starts a new lap) Yes
Auto Scroll (cycles through data pages during workout) Yes
Advanced workouts (create custom, goal-oriented workouts) Yes
Time/distance alert (triggers alarm when you reach goal) Yes
Interval training (set up exercise and rest intervals) Yes
Heart rate-based calorie computation Yes
Calculates calories burned Yes
Customizable screen(s) Yes
Power meter compatible (displays power data from compatible 3rd party ANT+™-enabled power meters) Yes (records data approx. 1 per second)
Temperature (displays and records temperature while you ride) Yes
Shock Resistant Yes
Garmin Connect™
Garmin Connect™ compatible (online community where you analyze, categorize and share data) Yes
Automatic sync (automatically transfers data to your computer) Yes
Additional
Additional Compatible with Varia™ bike radar and lights: Yes
Edge® remote compatibility: Yes
LiveTrack: Yes
Advanced performance and power analysis, including VO2 max, FTP/Watts/kg tracking, Performance condition/lactate threshold/stress score as well as advanced cycling dynamics, GroupTrack, in-ride challenges through Strava live segments and connected features
Bike trainer profile for compatible Turbo trainer data display and control: Yes
On-device segment compatibility for dynamic and engaging in-ride competition: Yes
Operating temperature: -20°C to +55°C
Connected features via a smartphone: Yes
Compatible with Garmin Connect™ and Garmin Connect™ Mobile: Yes
Integration with Shimano Di2 electronic shifting: Yes
Weather alerts: Yes
Preloaded Garmin cycling map: Yes
Wi-Fi® compatible: Yes
Ambient light: Yes
Round-trip routing: Yes
Route planner: Yes
Incident detection: Yes
Training plans/workouts: Yes
Connect IQ™ store compatible: Yes
Audio prompts: Yes
ANT+™ electronic shifting compatibility: Yes
¹ Advanced workouts require a Garmin Connect account

 

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Suunto Spartan Ultra & Sport- Company Sales Presentation

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With the sparse detail initially released about the Suunto Spartan Ultra, it’s great that with the announcement of the SPORT model/variant along comes a LOT more detail.

Let’s have a look.

This is the presentation being used by some of the Suunto sales teams (Source: Officially from Sunnto PR). <Here> it is in its pdf-fullness and HUGE amount of detail. And below are a few pages I’ve put in an image slideshow – they were 10 of the ones that I found personally interesting. The pdf has MANY more slides:

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There’s some detail about the battery life mode.

  • A worry with the market-leading screen resolution is that it will eat into the battery life. It seems to me that, from the slides, the Ultra model probably just has a bigger physical battery – speculating this could be to make space for the optical HR that will follow later this year.
  • Even in maximum accuracy mode a creditable 10 hours of training time is delivered. Up to 40/65 hours (sport/ultra) of battery life can be eeked out of the device if needed for the Ultra sports people.
  • This all seems plausibly useful. Let’s wait for the watch itself.

Sports Expertise

  • Again, this looks market-leading
  • 80 sports, 100 Sports Modes. (That might just about cover it all for me) eg bike race, bike group ride, bike with power, bike without HR. The sport modes LOOK like they will be useful to me.
  • *NB* Apps to be compatible later!!!! I was told this was not the case before. Let’s see what pans out. I never looked closely at the Suunto apps previously most of Garmin/Sunnto’s apps never seemed overly useful to me. Just a personal thing.

Movescount has some Peer Group Insights

  • Again, this looks market-leading and novel.
  • Quickly looking at this you can see what level people in your Age Group have been training at in order to achieve certain race times. That will have some use but other factors will be at play that might make it easier or harder for you to emulate their performances than just the training.
  • But there are 20 metrics you can look at here and various combinations of the triathlon sport (eg including trail running)
  • Summary: Can’t hurt! Good analysis fodder to while away the evenings.

Heatmap Insights

  • Again, this looks market-leading and novel.
  • The heatmaps look super cool. But I have a feeling they might be gimmicky.
  • Then again I’m a bit boring and tend to do similar routes. If YOU are travelling to a new City or a new forest then being able to create MOVES from heatmaps could be a good way to get to meet fellow athletes or choose safe routes or just simply to chose routes that will actually get you to your destination in unknown and difficult terrain.

Future Plans

  • A lot is planned for inclusion in Aug 2016 including cached HR, routes, breadcrumb navigation, cycling and running power, LOTS of screen variants including 7 metrics per screen, footpod support. (There you go Garmin, footpod support right from the start…someone has been listening..ie not one year later like for the 920/Fenix3).
  • Then some more stuff for autumn/fall eg activity history and stroke recognition (that should be there earlier though I have to say).
  • PB trends
  • Massive PR/PB details in Movescount by Age Group
  • Tracking Day Types – This looks interesting where the balance of RACE, TRAINING, Active-RECOVERY, REST, etc to look at the holistic balance of your training. I know many of us will have the watch showing 7 days training and 0 days of anything else. Secretly we all know that’s wrong:-)

PS I think I once got a free heart rate strap from Suunto that I’ve used about 10 times. That’s all. They haven’t bought me off, honest. Either that or I am very, very cheap. You decide:-)

IRONMAN UK THIS WEEKEND

Ironman_ Wales

Ironman UK return again in a few days. For a lot of people it’s the culmination of many weeks and months of VERY hard work. Good luck to everyone.

There’s the press release below for those of you who want to read it. Some interesting snippets for you are that there is a USD50,000 prize purse and that 49% of the 2,500 regular entrants are doing their first ever Ironman, coming from 38 countries! Wow. Testament to the massive growth in the popularity of the sport at this distance as well as the implication of growth in the shorter races too.

Maybe 2017. Maybe!

 ————– Press Release ————

Lucy Gossage returns to defend her title and Bolton stages world’s largest IRONKIDS event  

Bolton is getting ready for the thrill of the IRONMAN UK this weekend (16-17 July) as some of the finest IRONMAN athletes put on a show in the town.

Across the weekend, over 5,000 people aged 3 – 70 will be part of the action as Bolton welcomes IRONMAN UK for the 8th time in its 12 year history.

IRONKIDS will mark the start of the weekend’s racing from 8am on Saturday (16th July). This sell out event, supported by Bolton Council, will see just over 2,500 budding stars of the future aged 3 – 14 take part in this ‘fun run’ in Bolton’s town centre.

The main event day is Sunday (17th July) when IRONMAN UK gets underway at 6am at Pennington Flash, Wigan before taking in some stunning scenery on the Lancashire bike course, running through to the finale in Bolton’s Le Mans Crescent 17 hours later at 11pm. More than 2,500 athletes have registered to take on this ultimate IRONMAN challenge of swimming 2.4 miles, biking 112 miles, culminating with a 26.2 mile marathon run.

Leading the way will be some of the finest IRONMAN pro triathletes, battling it out for the $50,000 prize purse, whilst also looking for qualifying points towards their IRONMAN World Championship Pro rankings.

In the Men’s Pro field, IRONMAN UK welcomes Germany’s Michael Raelert for the first time together with recent IRONMAN 70.3 Staffordshire Champion, Markus Thomschke as favourites against UK’s Fraser Cartmell, Harry Wiltshire and Ritchie Nicholls. However a spread of entries from Europe and further afield, including Romain Guillaume (FRA), Andrej Vistica (HRV) and Krill Kotsegarov  (EST) are certain to be putting the German’s under pressure for the title.

In the Women’s Pro race, 2013 and 2015 Champion Lucy Gossage returns to defend her title. Relishing racing on home soil and fresh from also winning IRONMAN 70.3 Staffordshire last month, Gossage is firm favourite amongst a small but strong female field including Tine Deckers (BEL), Alyssa Geodesy (USA) and Germany’s Kristin Moeller and Katja Konschak all hoping for a podium finish in the UK for the first time.

From the 2,500 entries, 38 countries will be represented with athletes from the age of 18 to 70 from all walks of life, each with their own story to tell as to why they’ve entered such a challenge.

Losing weight, battling health problems, marking milestone birthdays and charity fundraising are just some of the inspirational reasons why competitors are taking part, with a remarkable 49% embarking on an IRONMAN for the first time.

Thousands of spectators are expected and welcomed across the route, which starts from Pennington Flash, Wigan. The 2 lap cycle course will take athletes through the rolling Lancashire countryside and hot spot villages including Rivington, Belmont, Adlington, Hillsdale and Standish before heading off on their 26.2 mile run from the Macron Stadium. Music, entertainment and crowds will then be cheering them on all the way to Bolton’s town centre for the finish line.

Bolton Council’s Executive Cabinet Member for Regeneration, Cllr Ebrahim Adia, said: “We’re really looking forward to IRONKIDS and IRONMAN UK triathlon returning to town and welcoming competitors and supporters from all around the world to Bolton.

This is the eighth year we’ve hosted IRONMAN UK and our fifth IRONKIDS event, which goes to show just how well Bolton is able to deliver global sporting events.

The whole weekend brings a real boost to the town and we hope that the people of Bolton will come out once again, and get behind the athletes.

IRONMAN UK is one of the world’s toughest endurance races and we’d like to wish everyone taking part the best of luck.”

Kevin Stewart, Managing Director Ironman Britain and Ireland commented, “We are very much looking forward to welcoming all the IRONKIDS and IRONMAN athletes and their supporters to Bolton.  

We could not stage the event without such commitment from the local authorities and we are delighted to be returning to Bolton, which is a firm favourite on the IRONMAN calendar”

In addition to the weekend’s racing, there will be an IRONMAN Expo at The Macron Stadium, home of Bolton Wanderers, on Thursday 14th, Friday 15th, and Saturday 16th, which is free for the public to attend and a great opportunity to view and buy the latest sports equipment.

The weekend’s events are free for spectators to come and watch. With IRONMAN UK action taking place across Lancashire there are a number of opportunities and venues to view the event. The Macron Stadium/  Middlebrook Retail Park will be live from around 11.30am to 5.30pm and Le Mans Crescent in Bolton town centre, where the first athlete is expected to finish around 2:30pm.

Whilst there are road closures in place, the Middlebrook retail park will remain open throughout the duration of the race, so access for shoppers will not be affected.

For further information on the event, including road access and spectator hot spots please visit www.ironman.com/uk.

A Spectators’ guide is also available at: http://www.visitbolton.com/pdf/IronmanSpectatorGuide2016.pdf.

 

 

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